Yasemin Yildiz is Assistant Professor of German at the University of Illinois. She received her M.A. in German and History from the Universität Hamburg and her Ph.D. in German Studies from Cornell University. Prof. Yildiz specializes in 20th and 21st century German literature and culture with research interests in literary multilingualism, minority discourses (especially Turkish-German and German-Jewish), transnational studies, and gender studies. She is the author of Beyond the Mother Tongue: The Postmonolingual Condition (2012), published by Fordham University Press, as well as essays on migration, gender and Islam, multilingualism, and Holocaust literature. Her research has been funded by major organizations such as the Fulbright Commission, the American Association of University Women, the British Council, and the American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS). She is currently working on two new book projects: a study of the figure of the “Muslim woman” in contemporary German literature, film, and media and a co-authored study on immigrants and Holocaust remembrance in contemporary Germany (with Michael Rothberg and Andrés Nader).


Yasemin Yildiz is Assistant Professor of German at the University of Illinois. She received her M.A. in German and History from the Universität Hamburg and her Ph.D. in German Studies from Cornell University. Prof. Yildiz specializes in 20th and 21st century German literature and culture with research interests in literary multilingualism, minority discourses (especially Turkish-German and German-Jewish), transnational studies, and gender studies. She is the author of Beyond the Mother Tongue: The Postmonolingual Condition (2012), published by Fordham University Press, as well as essays on migration, gender and Islam, multilingualism, and Holocaust literature. Her research has been funded by major organizations such as the Fulbright Commission, the American Association of University Women, the British Council, and the American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS). She is currently working on two new book projects: a study of the figure of the “Muslim woman” in contemporary German literature, film, and media and a co-authored study on immigrants and Holocaust remembrance in contemporary Germany (with Michael Rothberg and Andrés Nader).